Brush Stroke

Different Types of Rattlesnakes

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Eastern Diamondback Rattlesnake

Found in the southeastern United States, these are among the heaviest venomous snakes, averaging 34 pounds. They sport a distinctive diamond-shaped pattern and are typically gray or light brown.

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Western Diamondback Rattlesnake

Common in the southwestern US, they are lighter with a brownish hue compared to the eastern species. They are the most frequent cause of venomous snake bites in the US.

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Timber Rattlesnake

Located in eastern US forests near water, they weigh 3-5 pounds and feature a dark brown color with light stripes. They are small pit vipers and are a common sight in Minnesota.

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Mojave Rattlesnake

Inhabits the southwestern desert regions including the Mojave Desert and parts of Central Mexico. Recognizable by their light brown or tan coloring with dark blotches, they are known for their aggressiveness and potent venom.

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Massasauga Rattlesnake

Native to North America, they are small pit-vipers growing up to 2-3 feet. They possess a gray or light brown coloration with dark markings and have heat-sensing pits on each side of their head.

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Pygmy Rattlesnake

Found in the southeastern US, these are the smallest thick-bodied rattlesnakes, growing up to 18-24 inches. They exhibit light or dark gray body coloration and have small rattles on their tail.

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Prairie Rattlesnake

The most widespread rattlesnake in North America, found in almost every state. They are large, growing up to 4 feet, and are light brown or gray with dark zigzag stripes along their back.

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Mexican West Coast Rattlesnake

Inhabits the Baja California Peninsula and Sonora state, often near grasslands. They are large rattlesnakes, reaching up to 5 feet, with black or dark brown coloration and light bands.